New Teacher Mentor Roles and Tasks

Definitions:

  • Roles – The kind of person we want a participant to BE
  • Tasks, The activities an effective participant DOES

INDEX:


POSSIBLE ROLES FOR MENTORS

By Barry Sweeny, 1988

THE MENTOR SHOULD BE:

1. A HELPER BY BEING:

A. A RESOURCE – A BASE OF EXPERIENCE ON METHODS & TEACHING OPTIONS

B. A GIVER – OF TIME, ENERGY & SUPPORT

C. A LINKER – TO “BROKER” RESOURCES & HELP PROTEGES USE PREVIOUS LIFE RELATED LESSONS IN THE NEW CONTEXT


2. A COLLEAGUE BY BEING:

A. AN ADVOCATE – FOR THE CHILD, THE PROFESSION & THE PROFESSIONAL

B. A CELEBRANT – TO SHARE THE JOY & BUILD PROFESSIONAL SELF ESTEEM

C. A CONFIDANTE – ESTABLISHING & MAINTAINING THE MUTUAL TRUST & REGARD NECESSARY FOR RISK-TAKING, LEARNING, AND GROWTH

D. A LISTENER – CARING ABOUT THE BEGINNER, THEIR IDEAS, DREAMS & CONCERNS


3. A MODEL BY BEING:

A. A FACILITATOR – ENABLING PROTEGES TO BECOME INDEPENDENT, MATURE PROFESSIONALS

B. A QUESTIONER – TO PROMOTE THINKING, ANALYSIS, DIAGNOSIS, PROBLEM -SOLVING & PLANNING

C. A VISIONARY – WITH A DREAM FOR TEACHING & LEARNING & A BELIEF IN THE PROFESSIONAL

D. REFLECTIVE – BY OBSERVING, DISCUSSING, GIVING FEEDBACK & SEEKING TO GROW

E. A SITUATIONAL LEADER – THAT CAN SEIZE “TEACHABLE MOMENTS” & CREATE GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES BY BEING:

  • 1. A TEACHER
    • SUGGESTING ASSISTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF INCREASED OPTIONS FOR BETTER TEACHING
  • 2. A MOTIVATOR
    • TO CHALLENGE, ENCOURAGE & PROMOTE THE DISCOVERY OF UNDEVELOPED POTENTIAL
  • 3. A LEADER
    • WHO IS SELF DIRECTED & WORTH FOLLOWING
  • 4. A NEEDS ASSESSOR
    • WHO RECOGNIZES STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT & READINESS FOR GROWTH
  • 5. FLEXIBLE
    • & ABLE TO ADAPT RESPONSES TO FIT NEEDS

Possible Tasks for Mentors of New Teachers

© Barry Sweeny, 1988

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE KINDS OF ACTIVITIES IN WHICH MENTORS MAY BE INVOLVED. What you do should be determined by the needs of your protege.

1. Assist the protege in selecting opening of school events to attend

2. Work with the protege to prepare the classroom & plan the curriculum for opening of school.

3. Meet with the protege for introductions & to schedule other worK

4. Provide orientation for the protege to the:

  • Classroom & students
  • School layout, resources & staff
  • Community & other district sites

5. Inform the protege of local procedures & expectations of educators

  • In the school
  • In the classroom

6. Help the protege locate needed resources, equipment, & services

7. Meet regularly with the protege outside of the school day to talk about your joint work, the students, & the protege’s reactions & ideas

8. Develop plans, assign tasks, & set goals for your work together

9. Demonstrate strategies to increase effectiveness & efficiency of your work

10. Be a one-to-one staff developer for the protege by helping to:

  • Analyze & evaluate ideas & experiences
  • Develop & test out solutions to problems
  • Encourage self assessment & understanding
  • Promote protege self confidence & learning

11. Discuss current, relevant educational research & theories & model a desire to learn more about them & to improve your use of them in your classroom to increase student learning

12. Model effective instructional practices & openness to feedback about your teaching & its impact on student learning

13. Demonstrate a willingness to be flexible & to adapt as appropriate

14. Arrange other experiences for the protege such as:

  • Visits with others who are models the protege needs to see
  • Attendance at staff development or at committee meetings
  • Research on topics relevant to teaching and classroom work

15. Use observation & conferences to coach the protege to develop:

  • Interpersonal & communication skills
  • Skillful use of observation & need assessment
  • More effective instructional plans
  • More flexible use of teaching strategies to implement plans

16. Set goals & implement plans for their growth as a mentor

17. Support the work & growth of other mentors & their proteges

18. Evaluate the mentor program & offer improvement suggestions