Example Mentor Checklist for Before Work Starts

By your mentoring colleagues

A checklist is based on two key assumptions:

1. The mentor probably already knows all these things need to be done, and done right away. But the program provides a checklist that is built on the wisdom of other experienced mentors, so the mentor does not have to work so hard to figure it all out from scratch. Most mentors are very busy already with their own job, much less the mentoring role too. This checklist honors the mentor’s precious time.

2. The items on the “checklist for before work starts for the protege” are all “one right way” items. These are things that are not big deals, nor do they require lots of analysis and critical thinking. That’s why we do not try to help the protege discover these things for themselves, like we would with activities where professional judgment is involved. However, these items would become a big deal for the protege if the protege were left to discover and learn all this on their own. Since it’s all quot;one right way” stuff, we tell the protege what’s needed.

A SUGGESTED GUIDE FOR MENTOR ACTIVITIES FOR BEFORE WORK STARTS

BUILDING TOUR: Site layout & location of:

  • ___washrooms
  • ___lounge
  • ___Department & Division / Branch offices
  • ___meeting, training rooms, and technology center / labs
  • ___supply room
  • ___custodian
  • ___Library / professional library
  • ___Media center and AV equipment
  • ___staff parking (versus executives, etc.)
  • ___rooms for specialists and staff support people, like HR, etc.

TOUR OF OTHER IMPORTANT PLACES:

  • ___the executive offices
  • ___location of orientation activities (explain times?)
  • ___any Resource or Research Center (and their hours and services)
  • ___local electronics or other needed goodies store
  • ___good lunch spots

BUILDING PROCEDURES:

  • ___hours for staff, building use other times
  • ___extra duties and activities
  • ___attendance expectations
  • ___movement advice, entry/exit from building, washrooms, lunch
  • ___staff “dress code”
  • ___fire-disaster alarms and drills
  • ___vending, eating arrangements
  • ___what to do in the case of accidents, emergencies

ACCESS TO RESOURCES:

  • ___supply requisitions, budget process
  • ___AV equipment requests
  • ___computer access, checking out of building
  • ___staff discretionary funds, reimbursements (and saving of receipts)
  • ___shared equipment and materials (with other staff)
  • ___books, supplemental materials

THE WORK:

  • ___the guides / manuals / Intranet or internal references
  • ___workflow / process and the resulting expectations for staff
  • ___the location and roles of support staff
  • ___management of the work “demands”, and pacing
  • ___introduction to job aids and available supplemental materials
  • ___planning & reporting procedure, expectations
  • ___subject matter experts on the building staff
  • ___teams or shared responsibilities
  • ___procedures for day-to-day and any associated record-keeping
  • ___impending schedule-calendar details a new person may not yet know
  • ___the “flow” of the work day, overview of transitions, collaboration, cross functional issues, etc.
  • ___a plan for the first week’s work (allow time for organizing and getting settled)

ORGANIZING THE WORK SPACE:

  • ___options for room or space arrangement and effect on effectiveness of the work
  • ___traffic patterns in the space and near the space
  • ___storage and access to materials in the space, near the space
  • ___controlling other’s access to your own materials, data, equipment, work centers, other security issues

PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DECISIONS AND PROCEDURES:

  • ___calling in sick, and personal or professional days
  • ___expectations for sharing with and support of colleagues, what others can do for you
  • ___we appreciate you for who you are, relax, be your personal best
  • ___make some time for you, the demands of adjustment to a new job
  • ___What the mentor should do if (s)he ever observes the protege doing something that is not effective, potentially harmful, or would place the protege at-risk.