Self Assessment on Mentoring Tasks

Self Assessment – Tasks for Mentors of New Employees, © Barry Sweeny, 2008

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE KINDS OF ACTIVITIES IN WHICH IDEAL MENTORS MAY BE INVOLVED. Therefore, this listing can be used as the basis for self-assessment to identify areas for goal setting and improvement. To do so

  1. Print out a hard copy of this page or a pdf (link to do that at the bottom)
  2. Read each item and reflect on your skill in doing that task.
  3. Mark a circle around the number that best describes your skill in that tasks.
    1 = No skill and 5 = Expert skills
  4. Finish all items, then reflect on your ratings.
  5. Mark an X in the far right column for the lowest rated 3-4 items.
  6. 6. Write 1-2 goals for your improvement as a mentor. If you are already assigned to a protege, use the needs of that protege to guide you in setting priorities for goals

Note – As an “ideal” listing, this is stated at a more general level that would apply across many settings and several proteges. However, a mentor’s primary agenda should always be to specifically identify and meet the needs of your protege.

Tasks for Mentors of New Employees Self Rating
(5 = High)
Goals
1. Meet with the protege for introductions and to schedule other mentoring meetings and initial work 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
2.Discuss the mentoring relationship agreement and “negotiate” to reach consensus on:

  • Confidentiality and what it means
  • The need for trust to create a learning and growth-oriented context for them
  • The parallel nature of the elements each must bring to the partnership for success to result.
  • Initial goals for the short-term work at least – longer-term career goals if possible
  • Frequency and timing of mentoring pair meetings and acceptable methods of communication between meetings (hours for phone calls, etc.
1 -2 -3 -4- 51 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

3. Assist the protege in selecting orientation events to attend and other early support and development experiences in which to participate. 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
4. Provide orientation for the protege to the:

  • Organization Mission, traditions, work areas, and key people
  • Building layout, resource and materials storage areas, bath rooms, and other staff
  • Community and other organization sites
1 -2 -3 -4- 51 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

5. Work with the protege to adapt and prepare the workplace, plan the first activities and steps, and seek needed resources and equipment. 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
6. Inform the protege of local procedures and expectations of employees:

  • For work hours and access
  • Within the department and team
  • For the protege’s specific position and work
1 -2 -3 -4- 51 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

7. Help the protege learn available support services 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
8. Meet regularly with the protege to talk about your joint work, the clients or customers, and the protege’s reactions and ideas 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
9. Develop plans, assign tasks, and set or revise goals for your work together 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
10. Demonstrate strategies that increase effectiveness and efficiency of the work 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
11. Be a one-to-one staff developer for the protege by helping to:

  • Analyze and evaluate ideas and reflect on experiences to capture learning
  • Develop and test out solutions to problems
  • Encourage self assessment and self understanding
  • Promote protege self confidence, learnin, and improvement
1 -2 -3 -4- 51 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

12. Discuss current, relevant research and theories related to the work and model a desire to learn more about them and to improve your use of them in your work to increase performance and results 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
13. Model effective practices and an openness to feedback about your work and its impact on desired results 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
14. Demonstrate a willingness to be flexible and to adapt as appropriate 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
15. Arrange other developmental experiences for the protege such as:

  • Visits with and observations of others who are models of practices and
  • attitudes the protege needs to learn
  • Attendance at professional development or at committee meetingsaligned
  • with the protege’s goals
  • Research on topics relevant to the protege’s goals and work
1 -2 -3 -4- 51 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

16. Use observation & conferences to coach the protege to develop:

  • Interpersonal & communication skills
  • Skillful use of observation & need assessment
  • More effective plans
  • More flexible use of strategies to implement plans
1 -2 -3 -4- 51 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

1 -2 -3 -4- 5

17. Set goals & implement plans for their growth as a mentor 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
18.Use a developmental model to assess protege needs and design mentoring to meet those needs 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
19. Reflect on and adjust your mentoring style to stay appropriate to the protege’s level of development. 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
20. Support the work and growth of other mentors and their proteges 1 -2 -3 -4- 5
21. Evaluate the mentor program and offer improvement suggestions 1 -2 -3 -4- 5